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JAYPEE JOURNALS
International Scientific Journals from Jaypee
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List of All Articles
1.  Case Report
Implant-supported Overdenture
Kuntal S Kadam, Shankar P Dange, Kishore Mahale, Smita A Khalikar, Arun Khalikar
[Year:2017] [Month:January-April] [Volume:8 ] [Number:1] [Pages:33] [Pages No:22-25] [No of Hits : 895]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10012-1162 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Edentulous patients often experience problems with their mandibular complete dentures. Patients with the resorbed mandibular ridge often complain of lack of stability and retention of the mandibular denture, together with a decreased chewing ability. While implant-supported fixed prosthesis offers many advantages, they are very expensive and not indicated in many conditions. Implantsupported removable prosthesis can be a choice of treatment in such cases. This clinical report describes a method to rehabilitate a patient with resorbed mandibular ridge with implant-supported overdenture.

Keywords: Implant, Restoration, Tooth replacement.

How to cite this article: Kadam KS, Dange SP, Mahale K, Khalikar SA, Khalikar A. Implant-supported Overdenture. Int J Oral Implantol Clin Res 2017;8(1):22-25.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
2.  Research Article
Submerged Plateau Implants: A Practical Solution for Mandibular Posterior Region
Dhruvi H Shukla, Sonal M Anchlia, Nisarg P Patel, Vipul Nagavadiya, Rohit K Panwar, Hardi L Domadiya
[Year:2017] [Month:January-April] [Volume:8 ] [Number:1] [Pages:33] [Pages No:5-11] [No of Hits : 609]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10012-1159 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Placement of endosseous plateau implants represents a valid treatment in the setting of limited alveolar bone height. This study’s objectives were to evaluate the effect of submerging and platform switching on crestal bone loss and redistribution of occlusal forces, the advantage of plateau design in providing more surface area for osseointegration, and the outcome of autogenous bone grafting from the implant osteotomy site as an alternate to exogenous bone graft.

Materials and methods: A prospective study of 10 patients with mandibular posterior edentulism was selected. Preoperative alveolar bone height (mean 11.87 mm) and width (8.22 mm) were measured on cone beam computed tomography. Twostaged implants were placed with 2.0 mm of submergence, which remained below the alveolar crest. The distribution of site according to bone quality and implant dimension was D2. Patients were followed up after 7 days for pain, infection, soft tissue dehiscence, and paresthesia followed by an average period of 1 year and evaluated for bone gain over implant shoulder, crestal bone loss, and peri-implant radiolucency.

Results: One-year postloading survival rates for submerged plateau implants was 100.0% in D2 bone, with no peri-implant radiolucency and statistically insignificant (ç-0.8 mm) crestal bone loss.

Conclusion: Submerged plateau implants have excellent survival rates and crestal bone level maintenance. The results of this study support the hypothesis that plateau implants can be successfully used in mandibular areas with limited bone height.

Keywords: Autogenous bone graft, Crestal bone loss, Plateau, Platform switch, Sloping shoulder, Submerged.

How to cite this article: Shukla DH, Anchlia SM, Patel NP, Nagavadiya V, Panwar RK, Domadiya HL. Submerged Plateau Implants: A Practical Solution for Mandibular Posterior Region. Int J Oral Implantol Clin Res 2017;8(1):5-11.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
3.  Research Article
Dimensional Changes in Periodontium with Immediate Replacement of Tooth by Socket Shield Technique: Two-year Follow-up
Farhan Durrani, Dhananjay S Yadav, Arpit Galohda, Patricia Ome Borang , Faizia Rahman
[Year:2017] [Month:January-April] [Volume:8 ] [Number:1] [Pages:33] [Pages No:17-21] [No of Hits : 592]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10012-1161 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Extraction socket healing and osseous remodeling take 120 to 180 days. Healing results in 50% reduction in the buccolingual bone in 12 months. Buccal bone loss of the extraction socket exceeds more than two-thirds with reduction in apicocoronal height by approximately 0.8 mm within 3 months of healing. Bundle bone is the portion of alveolar bone where fibers from the periodontal ligament (PDL) insert. A clinical technique was developed to preserve the bundle bone and the surrounding PDL through retention of buccal tooth root portion. This clinical case describes about immediate tooth replacement with an implant by preserving the buccal root in the anterior maxillary region with a 2-year follow-up. The hard tissue comparative correlation pre- and postoperative was measured using multislice computed tomography scanner (MSCT) and soft tissue by pink esthetic score (PES). The result after 2 years of evaluation was promising with negligible changes in hard and soft tissues. The study predicts encouraging results for immediate replacement of hopeless tooth in anterior maxilla without the use of augmentation materials. The surgeon should be experienced as the skills require expertise and knowledge.

Keywords: Buccal bone, Esthetic zone, Extraction socket, Immediate implant, Socket shield.

How to cite this article: Durrani F, Yadav DS, Galohda A, Borang PO, Rahman F. Dimensional Changes in Periodontium with Immediate Replacement of Tooth by Socket Shield Technique: Two-year Follow-up. Int J Oral Implantol Clin Res 2017;8(1):17-21.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
4.  Review Article
Implant Design and Stress Distribution
Preeti Yadav, Mohammed Tahir, Prashanth Shetty, Varun Saini, Deepesh Prajapati
[Year:2016] [Month:May-August] [Volume:7 ] [Number:2] [Pages:22] [Pages No:34-39] [No of Hits : 3394]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10012-1151 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Implant design refers to the three-dimensional structure of the implant, with all the elements and characteristics that compose it. Dental implants are subjected to various force magnitudes and directions during function. Because implants function to transfer occlusal loads to the surrounding biologic tissues, functional design objectives should aim to manage biomechanical loads to optimize the implant-supported prosthesis function. Thus, the primary functional design objective is to manage biomechanical loads to optimize the implant-supported prosthesis function. An implant has a macroscopic body design and a microscopic component of implant design. The microscopic features are most important during initial implant healing and the initial loading period. The macroscopic implant body design is most important during early loading and mature loading periods. The product used by the implant team may increase or decrease the risk of screw loosening, crestal bone loss, implant body bone loss, peri-implantitis, esthetics of soft tissue drape, implant failure, and implant body fracture. This article shall help the learner in making a judicious informed decision regarding the different factors governing the reduction of overall stress in implant fixtures and, thus, providing a better treatment to their patients.

Search strategy: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE from 1975 to 2014 to identify studies, from simulated laboratory models, animal, to human, related to this topic using the keywords of implant biomechanics, implant macrodesign, thread pitch, thread geometry, thread depth, thread width, and implant crestal module.

Keywords: Biomechanics, Dental implants, Implant design, Osseointegration, Stress.

How to cite this article: Yadav P, Tahir M, Shetty P, Saini V, Prajapati D. Implant Design and Stress Distribution. Int J Oral Implantol Clin Res 2016;7(2):34-39.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
5.  Review Article
Contact Allergy to Denture Resins and Its Alternative Options
Ashish Choudhary, Ashwin S Devanarayanan, Praful Bali, Ekta Choudhary, Jay Vikram
[Year:2016] [Month:May-August] [Volume:7 ] [Number:2] [Pages:22] [Pages No:40-44] [No of Hits : 2794]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10012-1152 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Intolerance to dentures as a result of allergy is very rare. In such cases, the allergy is triggered not by the acrylic but mostly due to the unpolymerized precursors. Epicutaneous test reveals the allergy is due to the presence of benzoyl peroxide initiator and hydroquinone inhibitor. In contrast, the monomers methyl methacrylate (MMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate are allergens that are primarily responsible and relevant for dental clinicians and technicians in their jobs. Latex and vinyl gloves are not adequate barriers for monomer and are generally unknown as clinicians still work with doughy acrylic mixtures without adequate precautions. Research papers were reviewed—many papers were studies for their cytotoxicity effects of Methyl Methacrylate. Various reports mentioned in the literature make the monomer as the main felon. Allergen-free dentures as an alternative to denture base resins and precautionary measures for dental professionals and technicians have also been mentioned.

Keywords: Allergen-free denture, Allergy, Monomer.

How to cite this article: Choudhary A, Devanarayanan AS, Bali P, Choudhary E, Vikram J. Contact Allergy to Denture Resins and Its Alternative Options. Int J Oral Implantol Clin Res 2016;7(2):40-44.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
6.  Case Report
Full-mouth Rehabilitation with Implant-supported Fixed Prosthesis.
Shweta U Rajgiri, Malathi Dayalan
[Year:2016] [Month:September-December] [Volume:7 ] [Number:3] [Pages:32] [Pages No:73-80] [No of Hits : 1726]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10012-1157 | FREE

ABSTRACT

The objective of a dental prosthesis is to replace the teeth and adjacent tissues to restore function, esthetics, and speech. Oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient is a challenge to the prosthodontist. Few patients have life-long problems with their complete dentures, such as difficulties with speech and mastication. Implant-supported prosthesis gives an opportunity to such patients a normal healthy life for their functional and esthetic demands. Implants are the most preferred treatment option to support and retain the fixed or removable prosthesis. Successful osseointegration enables both dentist and the patient to accept full-arch implant-supported prosthesis.
Literature is available on the use of full-arch fixed and removable implant-retained prostheses for completely edentulous patients; however, few patients are not satisfied with removable prosthesis even when supported by implants. Full-arch rehabilitation, a term used by many practitioners, has become a popular restorative option in prosthodontics. Full-arch implant-supported fixed prosthesis is a well-established treatment modality for edentulous patients. Longterm clinical studies have shown that this type of restoration can be successful for many years as success rates are high.
The aim of this study is to present a case report on full-mouth rehabilitation with implant-supported fixed prosthesis for completely edentulous maxillary and mandibular arches.

Keywords: Implant analogs, Implant-supported prosthesis, Impression copings.

How to cite this article: Rajgiri SU, Dayalan M. Full-mouth Rehabilitation with Implant-supported Fixed Prosthesis. Int J Oral Implantol Clin Res 2016;7(3):73-80.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
7.  Research Article
A Comparative Evaluation of Immediate Implant Placement in Fresh Extraction Socket with and without the Use of Platelet-rich Fibrin: A Clinical and Radiographic Study
Shobhit Arora, Shweta Bali, Priyanka Thukral, Anoop Bhushan, Meenu Taneja, Priyanka Aggarwal
[Year:2016] [Month:September-December] [Volume:7 ] [Number:3] [Pages:32] [Pages No:48-58] [No of Hits : 1047]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10012-1154 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The goal of modern dentistry is to prevent tooth loss and provide a healthy dentition with optimal functional efficiency, structural balance, and esthetic harmony. With the increasing success rates of dental implants, clinicians and researchers have turned their approach toward making the duration of treatment shorter and more comfortable for the patient.

Materials and methods: A total of 20 sites were selected and randomly divided into two groups. Of these, 10 immediate implants were placed with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), while the other 10 immediate implants were placed without any similar adjunct. The patients were prospectively evaluated clinically and radiographically using cone beam computed tomography.

Results: It was observed that the patients in test group are favored with rapid soft tissue regeneration, diminished vertical bone loss, and improve with early wound closure, which helps in achieving an esthetic outcome and better patient acceptance. It can be used to fill horizontal defect distance or jumping distance for complete resolution of the space.

Conclusion: Immediate implants with PRF lead to stimulation and acceleration of bone regeneration and show tendency toward rapid soft tissue regeneration and reduced peri-implant pain and inflammation. Overall, it is recommended to use PRF as a viable option in improving success and reducing the treatment duration in immediate implants.

Keywords: Atraumatic extraction, Immediate implants, Plateletrich fibrin.

How to cite this article: Arora S, Bali S, Thukral P, Bhushan A, Taneja M, Aggarwal P. A Comparative Evaluation of Immediate Implant Placement in Fresh Extraction Socket with and without the Use of Platelet-rich Fibrin: A Clinical and Radiographic Study. Int J Oral Implantol Clin Res 2016;7(3):48-58.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
8.  Review Article
Orthodontic Implant Failure: A Systematic Review
Suchita S Daokar, Gauri Agarwal
[Year:2016] [Month:January-April] [Volume:7 ] [Number:1] [Pages:24] [Pages No:1-6] [No of Hits : 736]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10012-1144 | FREE

Abstract

Objective: To use a systematic review to determine which all are the contributing factors that play role in success rate of orthodontic mini-implants.

Materials and methods: Different databases were searched without limitations up to July 2015. Additionally, the bibliographies of the finally selected articles were hand searched to identify any relevant publications that were not identified earlier. In vitro and in vivo articles were included. Both human and animal studies were included. Thirty five articles were initially selected, finally 28 articles were included in the study.

Conclusion: This review article conclude that success of orthodontic mini-implants depends on multiple factors which can be broadly classified under four headings- mechanical factors, biologic factors, placement technique, microbial factors. Mechanical factors included diameter of mini-implants, surface characteristics, load and its relation with implants, microgrooves, miniscrew versus manipulates, biologic factors included Inter-radicular space, skeletal growth pattern, placement site, racial factors, root proximity, placement techniques such as self-tapping and self-drilling placement, laser therapy, reinstalled mini-implants, pre drilling diameter play a vital role in success of implants. Microbial factors such as microbial floral changes after implant placement and inflammation surrounding the implants also have an important role in success and failure of implant.

Keywords: Anchorage, Mini-implants, Success rate.

How to cite this article: Daokar SS, Agarwal G. Orthodontic Implant Failure: A Systematic Review. Int J Oral Implantol Clin Res 2016;7(1):1-6.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
9.  Review Article
An Introduction to the Longest Fixtures: Zygomatic Implants
Rahul Sharma, Dhruv Anand, Ashish Choudhary, Anurag Hasti, Jay Vikram
[Year:2016] [Month:September-December] [Volume:7 ] [Number:3] [Pages:32] [Pages No:59-63] [No of Hits : 688]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10012-1155 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Zygomatic implants have been used for dental reconstruction in patients with insufficient bone in the maxillary posterior region due to tumor resection, trauma, or atrophy. They are an alternative to bone grafting and distraction osteogenesis. Brånemark introduced these zygoma implants not only as a solution to obtain posterior maxillary anchorage but also to facilitate the rehabilitation process. The zygoma implant is a therapeutic option that deserves consideration in the treatment planning process and has become a rescue procedure that allows for continuity of care without resorting to a removable denture. The purpose of this study is to review the developments that have taken place in zygomatic implant placement over years, including anatomic information for installing the zygomatic implants, implant placement techniques, stabilization, and prosthodontic procedures.

Keywords: Bone grafting, Resorbed maxilla, Sinus lift, Zygomatic implants.

How to cite this article: Sharma R, Anand D, Choudhary A, Hasti A, Vikram J. An Introduction to the Longest Fixtures: Zygomatic Implants. Int J Oral Implantol Clin Res 2016;7(3):59-63.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
10.  CASE REPORT
Cold Shoulder to Basal Implant: Its Time to Acknowledge Endosteal Implant
Vaibhav Shukla, Dharti Gajjar, Reema Shukla, Sorabh R Jain
[Year:2015] [Month:September-December] [Volume:6 ] [Number:3] [Pages:28] [Pages No:73-75] [No of Hits : 3191]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10012-1140 |

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Basal implant being a boon in implant dentistry but sometimes behavioral outcome is whimsical.

Aim: Replacing basal implants with endosteal implants.

Case description: This article refers to the management phases for failing basal implants. Although fractured portion of basal implant was cumbersome to remove leading to bone defect and hence endosteal implant with bone graft was successfully placed.

Conclusion: Management of broken basal implants with endosteal implants.

Clinical significance: Though basal implants failure rate is less, but in such a case where fracture may occur, can be managed by replacing with endosteal implants with the protocol.

Keywords: Bicortical implants, Implant failure, Endosteal implants, Bone graft.

How to cite this article: Shukla V, Gajjar D, Shukla R, Jain SR. Cold Shoulder to Basal Implant: its Time to Acknowledge Endosteal Implant. Int J Oral Implantol Clin Res 2015;6(3):73-75.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
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